Lake Powell Tribal Park

Antelope Canyon

A long time ago, herds of pronghorn antelope roamed freely in Antelope Canyon, which explains the canyon’s English name. It is not known exactly when people first discovered Antelope Canyon. According to local Navajos, who have lived here for some time, the canyon and the LeChee area were places where cattle grazed in winter.

To older Navajos, entering a place like Antelope Canyon was like entering a cathedral. They would probably pause before going in, to be in the right frame of mind and prepare for protection and respect. This would also allow them to leave with an uplifted feeling of what Mother Nature has to offer, and to be in harmony with something greater than themselves. It was, and is, a spiritual experience.

Lake Powell Navajo Tribal Park manages the following areas:


Upper Antelope Canyon

The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse’bighanilini, which means “the place where water runs through rocks.” Upper Antelope is at about 4,000 feet elevation and the canyon walls rise 120 feet above the streambed. Located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Tour guides are mandatory. Please make arrangements for a tour to visit Upper Antelope Canyon. As of May 1, 2011, there is a two-hour limit inside Upper Antelope Canyon.


Lower Antelope Canyon

Lower Antelope Canyon’s Navajo name is Hasdestwazi, which means “spiral rock arches.” Located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Tour guides are mandatory. Please make arrangements for a tour to visit Lower Antelope Canyon. As of May 1, 2011, there is a two-hour limit inside Lower Antelope Canyon.


Upper Part of East Waterholes

The upper part of East Waterholes is accessible by guided tours only. Please make reservations with Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours listed under the Guided Tours page.


Lower Part of East Waterholes

The lower part of East Waterholes requires a Backcountry Permit to access this area, which is located just off Highway 89 at milepost 542.


Rainbow Bridge Trail

Known as the world’s highest natural bridge, Rainbow Bridge spans about 275 feet long, and is 42 feet thick and 33 feet wide. To the Navajo people, this is a very sacred and religious place. A Backcountry Hiking Permit is necessary to access this area.

Navajo Nation Parks & Rec
Phone (928) 871-6647
Map Marker

Land Department/Parks & Recreation 48 West Taylor Rd. Bldg #8966, Hwy 264,  St. Michaels, Arizona 86515

Our Mission is to protect, preserve and manage tribal parks, monuments and recreation areas for the perpetual enjoyment and benefit of the Navajo Nation – the spectacular landscapes, buttes, canyons, clean air, diversity of plants and wildlife, and areas of beauty and solitude.